Exploring Kyoto’s Kitchen – Nishiki Market 京都的廚房錦市場

The Nishiki Market is a five block traditional market known as Kyoto’s kitchen. It’s best to go there hungry for street foods. It’s also a good souvenir shopping spot.

錦市場是個五條街區長的傳統市場,號稱是京都的廚房,很適合一路吃,又可以採購紀念品。

 

The market started about 400 years ago as a fish market. Today, shops at this market sell produce, fish, and meat. There are ready-to-eat street foods and restaurants with limited seatings. You can also find kitchenware, knives, Japanese snacks, and ornate souvenirs here.

At the east end of the market sits a small Shinton shrine, Nishikitenmangu (錦天滿宮). This shrine worships the god of learning who was a Japanese scholar from the 9th century. People come here to pray for wisdom and academic success.

錦市場四百年前就開始營業了,一開始是個魚市場,現在整條街除了魚肉蔬果之外,還有餐廳和廚具、刀具、零食、紀念品。市場的東邊是錦天滿宮,是個神道教的神社,拜的是學習之神,是西元九世紀的一位學者,大家會來這裡求智慧和學業成就。

I of course touched the bull and prayed here. I’m going to be so smart.

我摸了金牛,拜了天滿神,又蓋了超多個章,整個非常想要變聰明。

Japanese pickles, called tsukemono, are a Kyoto specialty. There are some beautiful pickle shops at the Nishiki Market.

錦市場的木桶和漬物真的超美。

 

When planning the trip, I had wanted to come here hungry and try all kinds of food. We didn’t have enough time in Kyoto for that to happen. When we went to the market, I was still extremely full from the amazing wagyu beef sukiyaki.

One of the most famous food items at this market is tamagoyaki — a Japanese omelette made by rolling several layers of cooked egg into a block. At some fancy sushi shops, understudies have to spend a full year to try to master making this grilled egg roll. I really wanted to try that dish from 三木鶏卵, but they only sell it by a whole roll. I was too full for that amount of food.

排行程的時候,幻想要來錦市場一路大吃,結果時間太短根本排不出肚子有空位的時間,來錦市場的時候還在飽,壽喜燒吃得超撐,連本來很想嘗試的三木雞卵玉子燒都沒吃到,整條整條在賣實在太為難我了。

This fish shop is known for their fried fish. Again, too full to eat…

魚力的炸魚也是看了就覺得還在好飽。

You have to stop by Nishikimochitsukiya (錦 もちつき屋) for a small cup of Warabimochi — a confection made from bracken starch and covered or dipped in roasted soybean powder “kinako.” This is a must-eat at the Nishiki Market. The texture is between mochi and jelly. Sort of a softer version of Turkish delight. (200 yen for a small cup.)

在錦市場吃了蕨餅才發現對蕨餅沒興趣是因為在台灣吃過的都太弱了,這家蕨餅有黃豆和黑糖的香,又很軟綿,好好吃!(一小杯日幣200)

The black sesame soft serve we tried was incredible.

黑芝麻冰淇淋也很好吃。

One of the most well-known dessert in Kyoto is kuzukiri from Kagizen(鍵善良房) in Gion. Kuzukiri (葛きり) is kudzu starch noodles. The starch noodles are served chilled with Okinawa artisan brown sugar on the side as a dipping sauce. An order of this dessert at the famous Kagizen costs 900 yen. We didn’t have time to go, also…it’s so expensive. I decided to buy some kudzu starch noodles from this shop to try at home.

Next time I am in Kyoto, I want to try the raw egg over rice or chazuke (rice in dashi) here.

本來想來吃茶泡飯或生雞蛋拌飯的田邊屋也是無緣,但是買了一小包葛切,沒吃到鍵善良房的葛切,只好買回家自己煮。

The kudzu starch noodles on the right were much more expensive. They are 100% made of kudzu starch. The ones on the left were much cheaper because it was mixed with tapioca powder or some other starch.

The noodles need to be soaked in water for three hours before cooking. Bring the water to boil and cook them for 5-6 minutes. Turn off the heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Then place the cooked noodles in ice cold water to chill.

右邊比較深色的葛切貴很多,是百分之百用葛粉做的,左邊的比較便宜,是混了葛粉和似乎是地瓜粉做的。

葛切煮之前要泡水三小時,水滾了之後要煮五到六分鐘,再悶二十分鐘,撈起來之後放到冰水裡面就可以吃了,其實頗費時,純葛粉的葛切也不便宜,難怪在餐廳吃這麼貴。

It takes about two hours to stroll through the market. Although some shops open as early as 8 am, from noon to 5 pm is the time most of the shops are open.

The Nishiki Market is one block north of Shijo Avenue (四条通 Shijō-dōri) and runs parallel to it, starting from Teramachi Street(寺町通 Teramachi-dōri) to the west.

錦市場跟四條通平行,在四條通往北一條街,從寺町通開始大概五個街區,可以花個兩個小時慢慢吃慢慢逛,有些店早上八點就開了,不過大部分都是中午到下午五點之間營業。

 

 

Nishiki Market

http://www.kyoto-nishiki.or.jp/

 

 

 

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